DESERTS, MOUNTAINS RECORDED HOTTEST AVERAGE TEMPERATURES ON RECORD FOR EARLY SUMMER PERIOD...

Tina Robinson, left, and Eric Johns of Chicago beat the heat by walking under a cool mist and sipping cold drinks in Palm Springs. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

 

The last 30 days in Southern California’s deserts and mountains were the hottest on record for that period, according to the National Weather Service in San Diego...

Average temperatures in Big Bear, Palm Springs, Palomar Mountain and Borrego Springs hit historic highs between June 18 and Monday, due to an unusually persistent span of heat and few changes in weather patterns — such as rain — meteorologist Brett Albright said.

“A pattern that is stagnant like that and is very persistent is going to give us a lot of heat,” he said.

Big Bear’s average temperature in the last month was 67.6 degrees, while Palm Springs’ was 98, Palomar Mountain’s was 77.6 and Borrego Springs’ was 95.9.

Related:

Flood risk begins to ease along California rivers after six-month surge in water levels

By contrast, the second-hottest mid-June to mid-July period in Big Bear was recorded in 2002, at 67.1 degrees. Palm Springs’ next hottest period was in 2006 at 96 degrees; Palomar Mountain’s was in 1970 at 76.4 degrees; and Borrego Springs’ was in 1990 at 95 degrees.

Over the last month, Palm Springs hit 122 degrees four times in the span of three weeks, edging close to its highest-ever recorded temperature of 123 degrees.

“That is really a pretty big number for them considering their all-time record high,” Albright said.

Albright attributed the increase in mountain temperatures to warm nights. He also said that valleys were protected from the heat by onshore winds and sea breezes.

by Meg Bernhard

July 18th, 2017

megan.bernhard@latimes.com

@meg_bernhard

source: http://www.latimes.com

original story HERE

 

Sign Up for Our Free Global Warming Blog RSS feed by clicking here. About once a week you will automatically get all the best blog stories of the week. (The blog now has thousands of articles.)

Share This Blog Post: If you would like to share this blog post, go to the original shorter version of this post and look to lower right for the large green Share button. Ask them to sign up too for the Global Warming Blog.

Click here for information on the groundbreaking and disruptive new Climageddon book. It is about the global warming emergency and what you can do to help end it!

To View Our: current positions, opinions, agreement or disagreement with this blog article or its facts, click here.

Sign Up for Our Free Global Warming Blog RSS feed by clicking here. About once a week you will automatically get all the best blog stories of the week. (The blog now has thousands of articles.)

Share This Blog Post: If you would like to share this blog post, go to the original shorter version of this post and look to lower right for the large green Share button. Ask them to sign up too for the Global Warming Blog.

Click here for information on the groundbreaking and disruptive new Climageddon book. It is about the global warming emergency and what you can do to help end it!
To View Our: current positions, opinions, agreement or disagreement with this blog article or its facts, click here.

Be the first to comment

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.
Sign Up For Newsletter Take Action Donate

David Pike, Editor