THE SHOCKING ANIMATION THAT SHOWS DRASTIC INCREASES IN TEMPERATURE IN 191 COUNTRIES OVER THE PAST CENTURY...

Cooling off in a puddle in Karachi, Pakistan, on Thursday, as the death toll from a heat wave reached 1,000. Credit Rehan Khan/European Pressphoto Agency

 

Dramatic increases in global temperatures over the past 100 years can be seen in a shocking new animation, reminiscent of the pulses of a heartbeat...

  • Antti Lipponen from the Finnish Meteorological Institute created the video
  • It depicts the rhythm of global warming in each of the 191 countries recorded  
  • Nations are grouped together into continents and no region has been immune
  • Temperatures are shown to steadily increase throughout the twentieth century 
  • A rapid rise takes place in the 1980s with huge and growing spikes in heat levels

TIPPING POINT? 

More than a century's worth of data has been condensed into a 35 second clip by a Finnish physicist, using information made publicly available by Nasa.

It reveals a massive rise in measurements taken across 191 countries between 1900 and the present day. 

The visualisation also makes it starkly clear that there has been an acceleration in this process in recent decades.

For much of the twentieth century temperature levels build slowly, with cooler colours visible until the 1980s.

From this point onwards, the bars rapidly begin to build and become an angrier shade before reaching the present day.

Softly pulsing blue and yellow lines give way to darker hues as the twentieth century progresses, culminating in an aura of harsh reds and a huge spike in heat levels.

Antti Lipponen, a researcher at the Finnish Meteorological Institute, created the video.

It depicts the rhythm of global warming in each of the countries recorded, from Algeria to Zambia. 

Each bar shows that nation's average temperature each year, with colour and length representing spikes and dips. 

The darker the colour and the longer the line, the higher the temperature. 

But unlike a heartbeat the rate of the pulses does not remain constant, building as the years roll by.

Countries are grouped together into continents, allowing viewers to easily locate their home state.

It seems clear from the footage that no region has been immune to the ongoing effects of climbing temperatures.

Speaking to LiveScience, Dr Lipponen said: 'There are no single countries that clearly stand out from the graph.

'The warming really is global, not local.'

The visualisation also makes it starkly clear that there has been an acceleration in this process in recent decades.

For much of the twentieth-century temperature levels build slowly, with cooler colors visible (pictured) until the 1980s

  

From 1980 onwards (pictured), the bars rapidly begin to build
They become angrier shades before reaching the present day (pictured)

From 1980 onwards (left), the bars rapidly begin to build and become angrier shades before reaching the present day (right)

For much of the twentieth century temperature levels build slowly, with cooler colours visible until the 1980s.

From this point onwards, the bars rapidly begin to build and become angrier shades before reaching the present day.

World temperatures hit a record high for the third year in a row in 2016. 

And this is not the first time that experts have turned to graphical representations to convey the situation facing the planet.

In January, Kevin Pluck from Manchester posted his alarming 'doom spiral' animation which shows just how large the drop in global sea ice levels were in 2016.

In January, Kevin Pluck from Manchester posted his alarming 'doom spiral' animation (pictured). It shows that global sea ice levels were fairly stable for the last 40 years

His data was based on a graph released in November 2016, which shows the area of sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctic lost each year, from 1978-2017.

What is clear from both the original graph and animation, is that global sea ice levels were fairly stable for the last 40 years, until 2016 when they significantly dropped.

In the Arctic, sea ice reached the lowest winter maximum extent on record in March 2016, which did not bode well for the rest of the year.

And while it managed to avoid becoming a new lowest summer minimum extent, it was the second lowest extent ever recorded.

HEATING UP THE OCEANS

The amount of man-made heat energy absorbed by the seas has doubled since 1997. 

In a recent study, researchers tracked how much man-made heat has been buried in the oceans in the past 150 years.

The world's oceans absorbed approximately 150 zettajoules of energy from 1865 to 1997, and then absorbed about another 150 in the next 18 years, according to a study in the journal Nature Climate Change.

To put that in perspective, if you exploded one atomic bomb the size of the one that dropped on Hiroshima every second for a year, the total energy released would be two zettajoules.

So since 1997, Earth's oceans have absorbed man-made heat energy equivalent to a Hiroshima-style bomb being exploded every second for 75 straight years. 

A graph posted in November 2016 (pictured) shows the area of sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctic lost each year, from 1978-2017

A graph posted in November 2016 (pictured) shows the area of sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctic lost each year, from 1978-2017

 

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Share This Blog Post: If you would like to share this blog post, go to the original shorter version of this post and look to lower right for the large green Share button. Ask them to sign up too for the Global Warming Blog.

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David Pike, Editor