2017 SKS WEEKLY CLIMATE CHANGE & GLOBAL WARMING DIGEST #41

Firefighters from Compton put a scratch and wet line around a fire on Lovall Valley Road in Somona, Saturday, Oct 14, 2017. (Kent Porter/The Press Democrat) 2017

 

Story of the Week...

Firefight in Sonoma County reaches second week as flames force thousands to evacuate...

Read more
Add your reaction Share

PUERTO RICANS ASK: WHEN WILL THE LIGHTS COME BACK ON?

One month after Hurricane Maria, experts say poor planning, logistical nightmares and dire financial straits are to blame for the slow response to Puerto Rico's major power outage.By DEBORAH ACOSTA, NATALIE RENEAU and ROBIN STEIN on Publish Date October 20, 2017. Photo by Deborah Acosta/The New York Times.

 

Javier Hernández Saurí, a lineman who works for the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, is concerned about the lack of crews and materials on the island. Credit Deborah Acosta/The New York Times

 

CAGUAS, P.R. — Luis Rodríguez looked at the huge concrete power pole in his front yard, resting on his daughter’s Chevrolet and blocking the tow truck he drives to make a living, and wondered: When is help coming?

Read more
Add your reaction Share

RICH COUNTRIES MUST PROVIDE FUNDS FOR CLIMATE CHANGE VICTIMS...

Hurricane Irma left a trail of destruction through the Caribbean (Pic: NLRC via IFRC)

 

UN talks on loss and damage are failing to deliver for vulnerable communities. After a devastating hurricane season, the developed world must step up...

Read more
Add your reaction Share

HURRICANE IRMA’S OVERLOOKED VICTIMS: MIGRANT FARM WORKERS LIVING AT THE EDGE...

A line of residents of the rural migrant farm worker town of Immokalee, Florida, waited for emergency donations of food and supplies brought in by a volunteer group from Georgia. Hurricane Irma damaged homes, flooded their community and wiped out jobs they rely on. Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

 

Jobs, homes and lives are at risk when extreme weather strikes the communities that grow America's food...

Read more
Add your reaction Share

PUERTO RICO: HURRICANE MARIA LAID BARE EXISTING 'INEQUALITIES AND INJUSTICES'...

People use a rope line to cross Puerto Rico's San Lorenzo de Morovis river to deliver food and supplies to relatives. Flooding from Hurricane Maria destroyed the bridge. Credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images

 

People in poor communities hit hard by the hurricane are rationing their food, water and propane, and hospitals are trying to operate on shaky power supplies.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

PUERTO RICO'S ENVIRONMENTAL CATASTROPHE...

The flooded exterior of the paper mill and proposed incinerator site in Arecibo, Puerto Rico Vann R. Newkirk II / The Atlantic

 

Hurricane Maria has exposed and intensified the island’s ecological crisis and its human consequences. Can it build a sustainable future?

Read more
Add your reaction Share

EL NIÑO’S WARNING: SATELLITE SHOWS HOW FOREST CO2 EMISSIONS CAN SKYROCKET...

The Amazon and the tropical forests of Africa and Indonesia each responded to 2015's high temperatures in a way that played a role in rising carbon dioxide emissions. Credit: Neil Palmer/CIAT

 

NASA data collected in 2015, an exceptionally warm year, raises more concerns about spiraling global warming feedback...

Read more
Add your reaction Share

WILL NORTHERN CALIFORNIA SOON HAVE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA'S CLIMATE?

Firefighters work to control a blaze in Sonoma County, California, last week. Jim Urquhart / Reuters
The Napa Valley wildfires are eerily similar to those that often flare up near Los Angeles...
Read more
Add your reaction Share

FOREST FIRE CLIMATE REFUGEES? AS FIRES MOVE ON, WINE COUNTRY WONDERS WHETHER IMMIGRANTS WILL, TOO...

Cameron Mauritson, who supplies 60 wineries in Sonoma County, Calif., overseeing the harvest on Monday. Losing immigrant labor would be “catastrophic to our economy,” he said. Credit Bryan Meltz for The New York Times

 

Many of the foreign-born workers the region depends on are undocumented and do not qualify for most disaster aid. They may struggle to find affordable housing.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

AMERICA’S CLIMATE REFUGEES HAVE BEEN ABANDONED BY TRUMP...

President Donald Trump visits Puerto Rico after Hurricanes Irma and Maria.Evan Vucci/AP

 

The Obama administration was slowly working on a plan to deal with the problem. The Trump administration isn’t interested...

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Get More Info Here Take Action Support Our Mission

Subscribe to Our Global Warming Blog

Subscribe

Subscribe to Our Global Warming Blog

Subscribe